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February 2013

Picture Poems & Other Artworks

Art@42, 42 Pembridge Road, Notting Hill Gate, London W11 3HN

Though better known as a poet-singer-musician, Michael Horovitz has been making visual art throughout his 75 years, and exhibited at the England, Celia Purcell, Royal Academy, Ben Uri, Artists’ International & FBA galleries, among others. The artists who have helped inspire his visual experiments include the illustrators of old Jewish Haggadas, William Blake, Marc Chagall, Kurt Schwitters, Kenneth Patchen, R B Kitaj and Alan Davie – about whose paintings Horovitz wrote a monograph for the Methuen Art in Progress series in 1967.

Michael’s exhibition at Art@42 consists of examples of several aspects of his output: Bop Art Paintings, Collages, Jazz Paintry, Picture-Poems, Prints and Drawings.

The critic John McEwen has remarked on Horovitz’s “sensual pleasure in paint for paint’s sake, gritty use of collage, and origination in specific experience . . . Painters in my experience rarely like to admit to any influence, but Michael prefers the jazz and literary way, where influence is put to creative use in the form of variation, tribute and echo”.

And his fellow polymath Jeff Nuttall wrote that “Action painting, like the free jazz with which it is so frequently equated, reveals a deep and obvious division between the few practitioners who made it the vehicle for a new kind of form, and those who were hiding in the avant-garde – the mass of imitators who took advantage of the uncertain criteria surrounding a new mode, and the few who leave significant work: Pollock, De Kooning, Ornette Coleman, Archie Shepp – and Horovitz. He paints as he writes and performs, in dancing gestures, and possesses a skill that is most precious – conscious innocence, which takes wisdom to perceive.”

IMAGES
Reproductions of some of the artworks can be viewed here

MEDIA
Michael Horovitz is available for interview. Please address enquiries either by email to: michael.horovitz@btinternet.com or by telephoning 020 7229 5542.